Harvest the nature – Tid for høsting

Tyttebæra er moden, og blåbær lar seg fortsatt finne fram til frosten kommer. I tillegg er det uante mengder sopp i skog og på fjell. Det er bare tid det er for lite av om høsten.

I found a lot of these very nice cowberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea/tyttebær) yesterday. Picked a few and of course made a marvellous jam back at home. Don’t know how to do it?

Oh, it is the same with all wild, edible berries from the forest: clean them from leaves and bad berries, mix them with suger (f.ex. 50-60 %) and crush it with a fork or whatever: finished!!

And freeze some if you have got more than you need for the next week or so. And the best thing, you don’t have to put any chemicals. It keeps, specially the cowberries and cloudberries, who have a lot of natural preservative, benzoat. Other pictures of edible berries.

 

I often put a few cowberries when I make billberry jam, or blueberries as we say in Norway: Billberry (vaccinium myrtillus) is a close relative to american blueberries.

There was not so many this year, but they are to be found some places, at least here in Mid-Norway, and especially in the mountains.

As you can see in the pictue above, billberries and cowberries are often to be found in the same place. As soon as the first frost, the billberries are destroyd, but the cowberry can cope with a few degrees below zero.

As you can see here there are also other berries. Here cowberry and dwarf cornell (Chamaepericlymenum suecicum). Both of them red, but of different colous and shape. But it does not matter if you get some of the wrong ones also. Both of them can be eaten, but I don’t know anybody who purposely pick the brighter red ones.

The same goes for bog billbery, also called northern bilbery (Vaccinium uliginosum), blokkebær in norwegian. They too grow were the billberry grows and can easily be mistaken. But it does not matter. They are edible too. Most people say they do not taste much, but there are recipies for this berry too. Better cooked with suger than just smashed I would say.

Black crowberry (Empetrum nigrum), krekling in norwegian, is an other berry that often grows in the same places as billberry. It is black and does not really look the same, but can aslo easily be mistaken. Does not matter either. It is not only edible but contains a lot of anioxydants, as most of these berries. And it make marvellous juice, and some even make wine from this berry. Also billberries.

The cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus), molte in norwegian, can hardly be mistaken for any other berry. The orange coloured berry grows most often in mountain swamps and forests and is so cherished that we call it the gold of the mountain. But the season is usually in the beginning of august, so now we have to wait many months for this one.

In the meantime we can pick some other gold. The norwegian forest are full of golden chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius) and other mushrooms this year. So the only thing to hope for is a lot of nice weather and that the winter is not soon to come….. More pictures of mushrooms.

Among berries and mushrooms there are some poisonous varieties, some deadly so. So never pick and eat plants, berries or mushrooms you do not know.  Go with somebody who knows, or get your catch controlled by somebody who knows. This is very important, and my pictures or other pictures should never be used as the only source for identifying plants, berries or mushrooms.

Advertisements

One thought on “Harvest the nature – Tid for høsting

  1. Hej Bente!
    Dine billeder af blåbær giver mig oplevelsen af fjeldet tilbage. Duften af fjeld, det skiftende lys og tilstedeværelsen i nuet. Blåbær er noget særligt!
    Mange hilsner,
    Hanna

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s