My favorite nettle soup

Who hasn’t had a nasty touch of stinging nettles. Now they are back around my garden and I am very happy about it. Today I made my first nettle soup, and it tasted fantastic as always. And even better, it contains more vitamins and minerals than both spinach and broccoli.
Nettles are used when the plant is young, but you can cut them down and get new growth. And they can really sting, so use some sort of glowes when harvesting. I use the top of the plant, and they are picked were there are no pollution. Then rinsed in water and I also let them soak a few minutes in boiling water to get rid of the sting. This water is  discarded. Then I chop the nettles and simmer them in butter with onion, and I add a little flour before adding some stock. After boiling for 5-10 minutes I use a blender to make the soup smooth, then I add a littlebit of cream. Other use sour cream. I often serve with a boiled egg. Nettles can also be used in other ways.

I might also add other wild plants  in my soup, like goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria), an alien species that are hated by many gardeners. It also taste very well. What is really important is to never eat a plant unless you are hundred percent sure of the species, because there are plants that are deadly poisonous.

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68 thoughts on “My favorite nettle soup

  1. I have heard of using nettles for their health benefits. Perhaps I will give this a try, I have a lot of nettles in my garden. Thanks for sharing Bente. 🙂

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    1. Then you get rid of them, and at the same time get a very lovely soup. If the are too old, long and starts to blossom, then you cut them down and wait for new growth. Best of luck.

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  2. It seems the nettle leaf in your country looks different from here.
    They are more serrated. (In UK, they are more like egg shape)
    though, I guess the taste the same ?
    (I’ll try your recipe next time. —– by the way, they are not
    common in Japan)

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    1. Stinging nettle is native to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa, and as a weed probably found in more places. But maybe not in Japan? If you do not know the plant, get somebody who knows to verify before you eat it. This is VERY important, Joshizen.

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      1. It’s also in Japan though only in the mountain and rare.
        As there are many another edible plants, Japanese is
        not bother that all. I think, nettle couldn’t be mistaken as no another plant having the sting like them 🙂

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  3. WOW! First of all the first photograph fascinated me, I should say… You captured amazingly… And this soup seems so delicious and I haven’t known this… Thank you dear Bente, with my love, nia

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  4. I would never have thought of putting a boiled egg in the soup. Different cuisines. Very interesting though. And yes, I do remember my hands being blistered from nettles. I avoided them after that. Wouldn’t mind trying the soup though. I like how you described how to do it.

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    1. I don’t like to be blistered either, but loves this soup. With washing gloves you are completly safe, but I usuallu use some thin gloves in cotton on these young nettles.

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  5. Looks fantastic & I imagine tastes so as well. I was just reading a foodie article about nettle gnocchi. I think could really get the taste for weeds but I am a bit scared about identifying correctly what’s safe to eat.

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    1. Thats the right attitude. Never eat anything wild if you do not know for sure. It is maybe possible to find someone who can verify? As soon as you know, you know for later..

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      1. Actually we have a small tree called Olona that is part of the nettle family but grows without the nettle. It was a very important part of ancient Hawaii as they made clothing from the inner-bark of the plant which they grew in groves.

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  6. Beautiful image of the nettles. Leaves on their own aren’t easy to photograph and you’ve done it perfectly, Bente.

    (I make my spinach soup almost the same way, except that I don’t add cream – I don’t like dairy products. I don’t eat my soup with hard-boiled eggs either. I also make my spinach soup with young leaves.. I wash my spinach several times before cooking it, so one doesn’t get any of the gritty sand which are part of the soil, market gardeners use here as a growing medium).

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  7. I’ve heard of people making soup out of nettle. I even had a friend in college at Texas A&M who used to carefully pick the leaves, fold them so the pointy things were not exposed, and then chew on the raw stuff, kind of like snuff. Me? I won’t go near the stuff.

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  8. I’ve never heard of nettle soup. We have what we call Bull Nettle here in Texas and it gives a very painful sting. Interesting post and lovely soup.

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  9. Have been away, just catching up. So many gorgeous photos here, and now nettle soup! I learned of it when a friend’s Mum (British) called for it when she was ill. Best thing for you, was her view, and you show why.

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  10. I can’t wait to try your nettle soup recipe! We have an abundance of nettles this year and I wanted to try something new with them. Thank you for sharing! (I’m glad you visited my blog so I could see yours! 🙂

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  11. We have stinging nettle here in Texas. I’ve heard it can be made into delicious soups. I must try! I hope you don’t mind my pinging this post directly on my home page. It will remind me to get to cooking it.

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