Kon-Tiki in Tydal

In 1947 the explorer Thor Heyerdahl and five other norwegians crossed the Pacific Ocean from South America to the Polynesian islands on the raft Kon-Tiki. The documentary film made about the expedition is the only norwegian film that has won an Academy Award, in 1951. These days there is a new movie, an action movie about Kon-Tiki showing on norwegian cinemas. I have not seen it yet, but 165.000 norwegians saw the film on the opening weekend a few days ago, and the film is expected to be the most seen norwegian movie ever. Myself I went to a the small village Stugudal in Tydal at the same time. The village with only 80 inhabitants are showing a small Kon-Tiki exhibition in the village hotel, Væktarstua. It was run by Heyerdahl aunt, Martine, and this small mountain village is were he wrote the book about Kon-Tiki. Well, it was not a big exhibition, but interesting to know the story, and that this famous man has hiked in the same mountains as me.

Martine Lyng Unsgård

The exhibition in Tydal is showing a copy of the raft Kon-Tiki and the typewriter Heyerdahl used writing his book. The exhibition is in cooperation with the Kon-Tiki Museum in Oslo.

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55 thoughts on “Kon-Tiki in Tydal

  1. I’ve visited Kon-Tiki museum in Oslo long time ago. Read almost all Heyerdahl’s book 🙂
    One of the 5 great travellers of 20th century.
    I would like to watch this movie.

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  2. I have visit the Kon Tiki museum in Oslo twice, very interesting – remember as child some “copi” expeditions of Thor Heyerdahl to back up Thor – don’t really remember who but I mean it was Jacques Cousteau, but not sure – in the late 1960s and early 1970s I followed up Thor Heyerdahl close – I have to see the film… 😉

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  3. The Kon-Tiki Expedition was a book that was required reading when I was in grade 7 (a long time ago) in British Columbia, Canada.
    His trip was quite the undertaking at the time. He would not have been easily rescued in those days if he had run into serious trouble crossing the Pacific.

    I read another book called Aku Aku, which I believe was by Thor Heyerdahl as well. Very interesting, about the “long ears” (huge stone statues) on Easter Island.

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    1. I think the movie is showing some of the serious problems they actually endured during the crossing, and you are absolutely right, Anneli. They would not have been easily rescued if needed.

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  4. The raft was named after the inca sun god. I got this from wikipedia.
    Viracocha is the great creator god in the pre-Inca and Inca mythology in the Andes region of South America. Full name and some spelling alternatives are Wiracocha,[1] Apu Qun Tiqsi Wiraqutra and Con-Tici (also spelled Kon-Tiki. Thor Heyerdahl was one of my favorites growing up. He was what I wanted to be an explorer. Thanks for the post.

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  5. There is something very beautiful about history … I’d love to watch the movie – with subtitles of course <3. It's wonderful you're documenting your adventures for future explorers (:

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    1. Angela…. looks like it’s going to be released here in the USA. Netflix has it listed as waiting for release. It also lists the language as English (dubbed, maybe?)

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  6. How exciting. I never knew that the Kon-Tiki originated from Norway. What a small raft to make such a journey. You prompted me to look at Netflix (our DVD provider) and the new version is listed there, but hasn’t been released yet. I added it to my list of movies. Thanks for the info.

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  7. I think the expedition of the Kon-Tiki is something we read or heard about as children, but I never knew (or didn’t remember) that it was Norwegian.

    I’d love to see the most recent film myself.

    I’ve always loved adventure & travel movies.
    Nice photos of the exhibition and good to have as a reminder of once of Norway’s great 20th century adventures.

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  8. Gosh this has kicked the memory cells: I remember when I was a child reading about this expedition of the Kon-Tiki (Penguin Book if I recall) absolutely fascinated.
    An astonishing achievement for the time.

    Thanks for posting Bente,

    David.

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  9. My youth boyfriend Morten, his uncle was Thor Heyerdahl. He came to Sweden once to see my horse Anarchist race , when Morten rode him in Grand National. Yes, I have talked with this very old man then….

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  10. I am of an age that remembers the Kon-Tiki well. It was exciting, indeed exciting times for many achievements. I recall being marched off with the rest of my school to see the film (I think that was 1952). But even before that I had made my own model of Kon-Tiki which DID sail well on our lake. Like many events that occurred in that period of our history it is one you never forget. Your Blog was a great reminder, thanks

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  11. In my earlier days, I heard a lot about this great adventure, and always wanted to be there with him, on that tiny raft. I wonder how I would have experienced it; how would I have fared with the difficulties the weather and the huge oceans produced?

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    1. I would not have been there, Janina, I prefer very big ships on the ocean. But of course there is something with the project that make it look very exciting. I think I’ll be satisfied by just waching the movie.

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  12. Thank you for visiting me. I thought I would check you out and what a great surprise. KON-TIKI was one of my favourite books so many years ago – that and Easter Island. So nice to have found out a bit more about the author and the adventure itself!!! Thank you very much. I shall check inb every once in awhile to see what you are up to. I added you to my favourites!!!!

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  13. The museum looks very interesting. I heard about the movie, when it came out, but never saw it, nor did I read the book… but now I think I would enjoy it very much.

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