Music from the farm

terje_uv_bonde_cw-2

I think farming is important in every country, and the people making our food is doing the most valuable job. This week I visited a farmer who is a finalist to be the Young farmer of the year in Norway. He is running the family farm producing milk, and he is also a guitarist in two bands: Johndoe playing rock music, and country rock band The South. The latter just released their third album and tour our largest cities the next couple of weeks. I like this kind of unexpected combination.

terje_uv_bonde_cw

Most farms in Norway are quite small, not to say tiny compared with some other countries. And many live in the old farmhouses even if the farming has ceased, which unfortunately is the case in many places. The farm below has nothing to do with the young farmer. It is another farm in the neighborhood. Maybe without farm animals now, but it is good to see people are still living in these old houses. There are more pictures in my photo gallery.

gard_rennebu_cw

terje_uv_bonde_cw-4

Advertisements

70 thoughts on “Music from the farm

    1. I know a lot of Norwegians (and Swedes) emigrated because of hard times, I also have relatives who did. But it is strange to see the traditions from the old country still beeing around after so many generations. I looked at both the links and they are interesting. Most people in Norway too are now city folk, and have forgotten the importance of food production and traditions. Thanks a lot for your comment, Mike.

      Like

  1. It’s a very funny world, farmers in this country complains that they can hardly make living out of farming.
    In the same time another news says, the supermarket giant is making record profit, and we are said to
    be wasting 1/3 of food products and the people getting obese. —– transitional phase ?
    Or diversifying process ? —– Or, Just a chaos ? = So, no wonder why a farmer couldn’t be a musician. 😀
    (At least it is certain, the old stereotype “farmer is an old, traditionaly MINDED people”. )

    Like

    1. And what is funny, or a tragedy, is that it is exactly the same in Norway. Farmers making no money (many do other “normal” jobs in addition, or their spouses do), the richest people in the country are the owners of the 4 supermarked chains we have left, and we (not me) are said to waste 1/3 of the food. And people (not me) are getting obese. Music and musicians – yes, we need more ot this energy.

      Like

  2. That is an interesting combination; rock singer and farmer. I hope he sings to his cows 🙂 . And I wish him all the best in the Young Farmers Competition. We need our young farmers.

    Like

    1. I don’t know if he sings, but can you believe it: I forgot to ask if he playes his guitar for the cows. And can you believe it, he won the the competition so now he is The young farmer of the year in Norway. Thank Gallivanta.

      Like

  3. Great series. It’s very interesting. And I love the old houses. Be happy you haven’t such big fields like here in East Germany or in the US e.g. Investors come here and buy thousands of hectares fields to plant corn for producing biogas. Small farmes can’t no longer pay the high prices for the fields and must leave. But in our state in North East Germany (Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) they deciced now to support small farmers much more than the bigger ones. That’s a really good decision. Ha en kjempefin helg! 😀

    Like

    1. I agree: really good decision to support the small farmers, because they are doing a great job. It is probably not much a chance for investors buying everything around here, because in Norway it is not possible to have really big farms. We have too much mountains. Like Switzerland. I read in a farmers newspaper that the avarage numer of cows in a farm producing milk was (if I rememer correctly) 28 cows in the farms in both Norway and Switzerland. And that is not farm industry. Thanks allesistgut.

      Like

  4. nice clicks! sad to hear about the migration to cities and the loss of tradition. Farmers are so important in our world, and from the looks of it, so many of them are not treated the way they should be – they seem to be struggling with so many things. But as the comment above mentions, nice to see good decisions being made!

    Like

    1. Your are so right and I think these problems are the same more or less all over the world. it is not the farmers who are making money from the food, even if it is them producing it. And the migration problem is happening everywere too. Thanks for your comment, Gabbartrip.

      Like

      1. I agree. Initially, I thought it was a problem only in developing countries, but I think too that it is something that this is sadly, the story everywhere. Maybe, things will change! Regards

        Like

      1. Oh, that is bad, I mean the traditional farmers gone. But of course, the organic farmers are doing a great job, and in Norway they are often more or less like the traditional farmer, that is not too big. Very big farms is very few in Norway, since we have so little farmland and so many mountains. Thanks Jaap.

        Like

  5. Great post! The family farmer is really getting the shorty end of the stick in many countries. Corporate giants like Monsanto are killing us slowly… glad I’m be pushing up daisies before they fully take over the world… hopefully!
    🙂

    Like

    1. Pushing up daisies, hahaha you really knows hopw to describe it Plant Girl. But hopefully that will be in a VERY long time from now for both of us, and that GMO’s will be gone by then!? By the way, GMO’s are forbidden in Norway, at least for the time being.

      Like

  6. Beautiful pictures. Does he have other jobs besides farming a small farm and being in a band. Neither of those sound like they could support him totally. We live in a very rural area, and people have huge farms and other jobs that provide them a secure income. Farming is subject to many catastrophes.

    Like

    1. No other jobs as far as I know, Tchistorygal, but his wife is a teacher, and that explains somethings. Farming should have been the most important work, since food is what we eat, but as you say: so many catastrophes, and that goes world wide as far as I know.

      Like

  7. These are beautiful, Bente. It’s nice to see those small farms and although there a huge factory farms here more people are supporting small farms for the quality of the food and the care of the animals. It’s a nice shift of consciousness.

    Like

    1. If we care about quality and the care of animals of course we have to support small farms, I so much agree Karen. And farming in general. You have farm factrories around, wow, what kind I say, but they are everywere. But not here, we don’t have the land for them. But it might come for producing animals? We all need consciousness, for nature, what we eat, for everything. Thanks.

      Like

  8. Good to read that there are still young farmers keeping up the tradition. As you said, it is an important job they are doing, producing so much of our food. The combination of farming and playing rock music is indeed interesting. As for the cows, I understand they like classical music. At least I know some farmers who do play that over a music-installation all day in the stables when the cows are inside.

    Like

    1. I have heard about farm animal listening to classical music, and some also to pop music and radio in general. I don’t know about these cows though, if they are treated with some rock music? But important job it is to be a farmer. Thanks, Cybermum.

      Like

  9. Great series of images.
    There’s something about Norway’s timbered houses that really appeals to me. They have a rustic timelessness that reminds me of the early settlers in my own country of Australia (except the weathered timber colour and house shape is different).

    Like

    1. The old houses might have weathered differently since you have less cold and snow, and probably other timber woods as well. I find old houses interesting in all countries, and to see similaities and differences. Thanks for your comment, Vicky.

      Like

  10. Un grand respect pour le monde agricole qui existe grâce à une forte passion. Un monde à part qui apporte beaucoup. C’est beau de voir que malgré les heures passées à la ferme, il trouve le temps d’être musicien 🙂

    Like

  11. Härliga bilder! Är själv uppvuxen på en mindre bondgård. Det gör landsbygden levande! När jag var ung, fanns det kor på alla åkrar du åkte förbi, idag är man glad om man över huvud taget ser kor. I Sverige verkar det bara vara lönsamt med stora jordbruk. Min mamma och pappa som har en gård, kan inte alls försörja sig på det, tvärt om, de fick skjuta till pengar när de hade kor. Det blir en dyr “hobby”, d v s jobb efter och före det “vanliga” jobbet. Tidigare gick det ju att försörja en familj, och det har gått i generationer. Varför är det omöjligt nu? (svaret är den svenska jordbrukspolitiken)
    Varmt tack för dina härliga bilder! Ja, det är kul med en kilel som både spelar musik och är bonde 🙂
    Kram och allt gott till dej!
    Kolla här, förresten! http://framsnacka.wordpress.com/2013/11/09/idel-adel-solsken/

    Like

  12. Det er et dejligt indlæg, Bente, med fantastiske billeder.
    Jeg ville ønske, det kunne være rentabelt med de små landbrug, og de måtte gerne være økologiske. Tanken om de store landbrug med kæmpestalde, og forebyggelse af sygdomme ved hjælp af penicillin, er en dårlig arbejdsmetode med et skræmmende perspektiv.
    Mange hilsner til dig,
    Hanna

    Like

  13. Once again loved your photos, especially the one of the farm and all of the little buildings. It is very similar to the traditional Finnish farms, most are not used for farms but fortunately they are someone’s home!

    Like

  14. We’re unfortunately losing all our farms, especially the dairy ones which is terrible for me because I love cows more than most other animals. I like the last photo best. Completely agree with Madhu above too – it is the middlemen making the money and they are driving the farmers out of business 😦

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s