Help the buzzing bees

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In Norway we have projects like Buzzing gardens, that is a lot of initiative to help honey bees, bumble bees and other pollinators. They are in deep decline world wide and this is a huge problem. Because insects like these are pollinators, and have a key role in producing much of the food that we eat. Through pollination of crops such as tomatoes, peas, apples and strawberries, insects are estimated to contribute to €14.2 billion per annum to the EU economy.

There are many reasons to this decline, especially from changes in agricultural techniques and loss of wildflower fields. But as ordinary people we can in fact contribute. There are one million gardens only in this small country, and even more balconies. What we can do is to plant flowers, we can buy or build hides for the bees, we can stop keeping our gardens tidy in all corners, because bees also like wild flowers. And most important of all: stop using poison in gardening. Here is a link with ten steps on how you can help the bees.

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Moseplassen, a well known blog about gardening in Norway, have started Humlestafetten, a relay race to spred knowledge about the bees’ problem, and to make more people help these essential insects. I don’t know if I can participate, since my blog is in english, but I gladly make a post about bees anyway. I can even challenge some of my fellow bloggers to blog about flowers and bees. Maybe they would do anyway, since they are lovers of nature: In Sweden, Framsnacka, from USA, Hoof Beats and Foot Prints, from Australia, Living with Nature. and from France, A French Garden, a blog that often blog about bees.

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I have seen a couple of bumble bees this year, but it is only the middle of May and that means hardly any flowers yet so far north. So these photos are not from this year, but they are all from my garden, or wildflowers around my garden, and I am looking forward to seeing them again soon. We like them, both me and the bees. There are more photos in my gallery of flowers. If you want to sign a petiotion to stop some of the pesticides that kills bees, here you can: http://action.sumofus.org/a/home-depot-lowes-bees-neonicotinoids/?sub=tw

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71 thoughts on “Help the buzzing bees

    1. I just did, Rudolf, and I copied the link to my post too. It seems EU has decided to ban 3 insecticides containing neonicotinoid, and that is a good start. There are probably many insecticides that kills bees, and other chemicals too. And why use poison in a garden anyway? And farming really have to improve. Thanks, Rudolf.

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  1. I have found that one way to appeal to people who aren’t interested in saving bees is to tell them some of the plants bees pollinate. Most berries, for example, are pollinated by bees. Coffee and cocoa, too! And if you love avocados or tomatoes, it’s important to keep bees around. I think many people don’t actually understand that without bees, we would lose many of our favorite foods.
    Thank you for this post. and the photos were just wonderful.

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    1. Thanks for the tip, Emilie, to tell people they would have no more coffee and chocolate if all the bees are killed, that should help. Too many don’t know the importance of these little creatures. Thanks a lot for your comment.

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  2. Great photos, Bente, and I really appreciate your message. In the U.S. the biggest problem for the bee decline, just like you say, is the use of pesticides. As long as people continue to eat foods sprayed with poison, the bees will unfortunately continue to decline. Hopefully things will take a turn for the better, especially with awareness like your message here.

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    1. So we most hope more people stop eating food made with poison, it is probably not good for them either. And plant a lot of flowers if we can. Thanks for your comment, Jet Eliot.

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    1. I guess you are taking good care of your bees. Loved your bee-post then, and again, Gallivanta. And thanks for the tip, I had almost forgotten about A French Garden; she is the master of bees. Thanks.

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  3. Wonderful, wonderful post. Your photos are as amazing as always, and I am a friend of bees, too. I bring small plantings from local, wild areas where I shoot pictures instead of buying them from the greenhouse, let clover grow in the grass… no poisons. I’m so glad to find a post from you, again. It’s been a long, long time.

    Regards,
    Meredith

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  4. Beautiful images and a cry of distress to help the bees! In Belgium we have also plans to help survive the bees. Hold bees in the city it’s really necessary and helpful and not dangerous.

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  5. Great words Bente once again, I wholeheartedly support. I too am leading a project in Wales designed to create more flower rich grasslands for the benefit of the pollinating insects, especially our under pressure bees. Some of the grasslands are absolutely superb so its a great job!

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  6. They are absolutely gorgeous pictures. I love all the flowers.
    Thank you for sharing with us. Have a wonderful day!
    With friendship Ştefania. 🙂

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  7. I really loved your beautiful bee pictures and I think they can help so much to increase awareness not only to the beauty that is around us but the fragility of it at this moment. With awareness people can help by either creating more awareness or passing on the understanding of the current problems or helping directly by creating micro environments themselves.
    It against the law in France to spray pesticides on fields during the day yet a few days ago fields of rape were treated near me and my friend Michel’s bees came back dying and had even gone into peoples homes and stung people as the pesticide makes them “deranged” before they die. Amelia

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  8. Very good post !
    To help those bees, leave fallen and rotten trees as they are and let the bees
    to carve a hole and make it a nest. (Put a lot of pollen and lay a egg —- then make other one)

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  9. Incredible images! My jaw dropped literally! What camera and lens do you use, if I may ask? And about the bees, I grow Lavender for them, I have French Lilac bushes, Butterfly Bush, ROSES (lots of those!) and some more bushes that have flowers on them right now. Day Lilies, Azaleas, hmmm……what else do I have? Oh yes! Lots of Dandelions.! {GRIN} Every year the bees come back to our property, knowing I care for them. I was just asking myself if it is time to put out my Hummingbird Feeder. We are so behind here in the Spring schedule. I have to walk the land to see what I am told. OK. Enough rambling. *giggling* xx Amy

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    1. Yes, I have commented here, as I thought. I remember now asking you what camera you use, and I didn’t receive a reply. Your photos are just so crystal clear. Amazing! xx Amy

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      1. Sorry, Amy, I am so on late on my replies, sorry, sorry. I guess the photos above are taken with my Canon 5D II and a 100 mm macro lens. All photos have to be edited taken with this camera, and it depends how much time I have to edit. Thanks for the crystal clear, my hope is to improve also in that department. F.ex. by using my tripod, as I don’t always do…

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      2. I have a Canon 50D with a 60mm macro lens. So we are both about in the same range. I too am learning how to bring my photos in crystal clear, but like you said, some days, I do just the bare minimum. I think your work is perfect as is. I really mean that, Bente. I don’t use a tripod with my macro lens, and even I cannot believe the results. I don’t like the tripod because it limits you, it takes so long to set up just right, and it cannot get into places (like under flowers that are close to the ground) like I can. I really appreciate your reply. I understand, especially lately, how time consuming my blog has become. I really am questioning things right now. Yet, so many people love my work, how can I just give it up? Again, thank you so much for your answer. Love, Amy

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  10. I haven’t used poison in my garden for many, many years. I love the birds so I don’t use poison. And of course the bees would suffer too. This is a great post for raising awareness of what is going on in our world. Good job, Bente!

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  11. I’m working at turning my yard into a haven for bird, bees and butterflies. Aside from all they normally do, they are fun to watch and photograph. Great post, Bente!

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  12. Beautiful images, Bente.
    I read once that when all the bees disappear off the planet, the planet will be destroyed.

    I can’t think of any sound more pleasant than the buzzing of bees during high summer here in Australia. (well, maybe I like to hear the wind rustling the leaves in the treetops more).

    The world needs to stop creating genetically modified crops and re-instate natural planting cycles. Even in Australia I cringe when I see de-forestation across the countryside. And while all schools have environmental subjects and concentrated efforts planting native seedlings and re-landscaping creek and river beds, in some areas, the de-forestation of the 1930s has raised the salt table so high that nothing grows at all.

    I read somewhere that Bhutan is the only country in the world where the forests have been increased substantially and the farming is still along the old practices. I believe Finland is another country that is well forested. All chemicals should be banned in farming and the practice of ‘companion planting’ with the old herbs and plants which support crops. Every farm should have wildflower meadows between the food crops too. It doesn’t take much to reinstate the natural cycles of the seasons. It only takes education and sustained commitment.

    (thanks for the mention of my blog too).

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  13. Wonderful post. Thank you for sharing these lovely photos and sharing information on how important these small bees are to the world’s ecosystems. In recent weeks I’ve seen a few bees and a giant beehive here in Brooklyn where the flowers are blooming.

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  14. Indeed the bees are diminishing all over. We see that right in our own garden as there are fewer visits and reduced yield from our crops. Your bee images are quite nice, Bente.

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  15. Interesting and I was not aware of the seriousness of the problem. Thanks for the links. The world is under stress from so many directions.
    Joni Mitchell sang it many years ago, give me spots on my apples, but leave me the birds and the bees.

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  16. A wonderfully informative post — important information to get out there!

    And your photos are stunning. I tried to capture a visiting bee through my lens last week, and he would NOT cooperate! And I didn’t have the time to sit quietly and be patient …

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  17. Beautiful flowers! We do all we can here to help and encourage our bees. Lots of flowers and no pesticides. Happily, I have already seen more bees this year than in the past several!

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  18. Great series of photos, and absolutely love the first shot: crisp, delicate shot of the flow with the wonderment of motion with the bee. Incredible. And perhaps the best part is your commentary along with these series of photos, really wonderful stuff. Thanks.

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  19. La naturaleza eclosiona y el fotógrafo sigiloso y capaz se aplica a ser testigos de trabajos (o vida, entrega y, siempre, belleza).
    Belas imágenes. Felicidades Bente. Saludos occdentales.

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  20. Superb photos of both the flowers and the bees. I find it hard to get things sharp nowadays as I use manual focus and my eyes are deteriorating badly now 😦 They’re okay-ish for landscape photography though which is what I normally do.

    Luckily, I’ve seen quite a few bumblebees in my garden this spring and I’ve recently (last year) provided a house for all the different types of bees (don’t know if they used it or not though).

    I hope everyone realises how vitally important it is for them to help the bees. As soon as I heard of the problems they were having, a few years ago now, I was concerned. Not just because of their vital pollination duties, but also because I just love bees – especially bumblebees – and can’t imagine a life without seeing them. I’ve already signed the petition but I hope lots more folk sign it from the link you’ve provided.
    Carol.

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    1. Sorry to hear about the focusing, because in macro photography it usually have to be manually. I hope mine will last for some decades yet, and that you find your way to cope. At least the bee problem is bigger than all this, and it is so nice to see the concern spreading. I hope you have some tenants in your bumble-bee-home, Carol, and thanks for commenting.

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    1. Takk for det, og fin idé du har hatt til dette initiativet om biestafett, for det er så viktig. Både å fokusere på sammenhengene i naturen, og med maten vår, og ikke minst å fokusere på dette. Ser ut som mange er opptatt av bienes sjebne, og hvis de ikke er det, så våkner de.. Takk for kommentar, Anne på Moseplassen.

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  21. Hello Bente,

    thank you for post and your wonderful photos. Hope, that many, many people will read that and help our wonderful bees. It is so easy for everyone to do so much for them.
    Greetings from Germany,
    Petra

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