The European Columbine

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In my last post I had some problems with my editor. The design suddenly looked unfamiliar, or just bad. I contacted WordPress, that is the Forum, and got respons from a WP-person quite soon. I also got a description for how to edit my bad-looking post, so that is looking “normal” now. It is great to get this kind of help when in need.

Hi there, The New Post button is undergoing some changes right now, so it’s better to go into your dashboard to start new posts…Good luck!

The pictures this time is of The European Colombine (Aquilegia vulgaris). I have seen from fellow bloggers that there are a lot of these flowers in North America. We have them too. Mainly as an old garden flower, and some cultivated ones, but they also grow in the wild. It is on the list of protected spieces, but there have been little research so the staus is not clear yet. I love them anyway. There are more in my columbine photo gallery, and they are all photographed in my garden or in the neighborhood, and they have probably been around for a long time.

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80 thoughts on “The European Columbine

    1. At least you can see the difference from the American ones. They come in so many shapes and colours (breeding new varieties all the time it seems). I will try to look out for the American ones now, and learn more. Frilly, yes? And ce! Thanks for comments, Emilio.

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      1. The columbines that are here in Colorado are different from the ones we had in Michigan, and both are different from the Wild ones I found in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan (wild one is here: http://ejdalise.smugmug.com/Flowers/The-Early-Flowers/i-bcggQV9). There are some shots of our garden Michigan columbines in that gallery.

        This is a shot of a wild Columbine here in Colorado (it’s the state flower): http://ejdalise.smugmug.com/My-Photography/Samples-of-my-hobby/i-2XNgJgt

        That does look somewhat like the pink ones you have above. I’ve never seen the kind like the purple ones you show above.

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      2. There are so many different ones, and all lovely. I especially like the red and yellow wild one. All wild ones are fascinating. I think some of the blue and white ones looks a bit similar to a couple of mine who I think is cultivated (or imported). Nice photos, Emilio and so interesting to have a look at your colombines.

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  1. Your images are really beautiful……among the loveliest I’ve seen of columbines.

    We have them in gardens in Australia but not in the wild. They are not the easiest to photograph unless you can isolate one or two flower blooms and get the sun in the right position. The ones I see in the Botanic Gardens near my home have too many clustered together to make really good photos.

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    1. Since they belong to the Northern Hemisphere they are certainly garden plants in Australia (if they haven’t run off to the wild). They are here and there and everywere in my garden, and not too many together. Makes it easier to photograph, but it also takes some crawling. I guess there are beautiful ones in the Botanic Garden. Thanks, Vicki.

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  2. I love these flowers. I planted 2 small plants last year at Casa Debbio and this year they more than tripled in size. I am hoping for even more growth next spring. Your photos are beautiful.

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    1. They are on the list of protected wild species in Norway, that is native ones. But it seems there is a lot they don’t know about this plant. The fact it is also an old garden plant probably make it complicated. Thanks, Draco.

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  3. They got many different color and hue also in Japan —– so, I stopped to see the difference.
    Still you got quite frilly and delicate one. Beautiful. (Seems quite an effort to find an angle! 🙂 )
    Its Japanese name is Odamaki which mean the spool to wind the cotton (or hemp what ever)
    and it’s suggesting they must be there since ancient time.

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    1. Effort to find an angle, yes Yoshizen, that one goes for most photos of flowers. Interesting history from Japan. I believe they are among the oldest garden plants in Norway.

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  4. My yard had Columbines when I moved here. They are a very dark, almost black color and I’m not particularly fond of them. I would much rather have the ones you have posted here. But mine, of course, seem to be invading everywhere. They are out of control. That likely would NOT have happened if I truly liked them. 🙂

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    1. They have a million seeds, Gunta, and since they grow easily that sounds likely. Get some in lighter colours, when they mix you get a very interesting variety; everywere.

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  5. This is an extremely beautiful post, Bente.
    Det er vildt smukke billeder. Blomsterne udtryk er delicate, eksotiske og ‘alfeagtige’ 🙂
    Mange sommerhilsner,
    Hanna

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  6. I like the last photo best, so fragile; beautiful back lighting. I do like Aquilegias. I have lots in my garden, they seed everywhere – so you get free flowers!

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  7. I love columbine… I have never seen such a deep purple one before, gorgeous. They always look like mountain fairies to me… I have a ‘Betsies Bonnet’ variety, a hybrid created in Bozeman, and grows in full summer sun. It is a dusty pink as well.

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  8. I just love the ‘pink photo’ With the 2.8 and aiming towards the light you get this beautiful dreamy, soft sphere… very nice! The purple has a nice bokeh… she says very expert-like 🙂

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  9. Lovely soft focus on delicate flowers Bente . These plants in all their varieties are typically seen in old fashioned English country gardens … often known as Granny Bonnets 🙂 Self seeding they ensure a display year after year . Which I look forward to .

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  10. When I get back home I’ll see if I have any left. Mine have seeded themselves and filled one of my back flowerbeds in all different colours. I absolutely love that last photo. Almost ethereal. So delicate!

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  11. I love columbine and post photos of the many in my yard too. They grow well in the wild here in the foothills and I encourage their spread by shaking their seed pods where they will grow best in my gardens. Yours are beautiful!

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  12. Exquisite photographs! Love love love them. I’ve been collecting Aquilegia seeds for weeks now and have even managed to germinate some, although I’ve read that they are hard to grow. So I’m delighted. They are TINY but seem to be happy in our seaside location (West coast of Scotland).

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    1. Mine are not hard to grow, they actually grow everywere, in sand, between gravel, but there shouldn’t be to much vegetagion around them. I would just throw seeds were you want them, and they do the rest by themselves. Thanks, wildswimmer.

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  13. A truly beautiful flower beautifully captured.I especially like the soft ones with almost no contures. I think I have lost you on my Reader! I’ll try to unfollow and follow again. have a great week.

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